Walking maps of the Lake District

David Stone

29th January 2009

Abstract

This reviews the maps of the Lake District (in the north-west of England) which are intended for walkers. The Lake District is rather different from the rest of the country in what is and has been available.

Introduction

In most parts of the United Kingdom the choice of maps for walking is straightforward: either 1:50 000 or 1:25 000, both published by the Ordnance Survey. In the Lake District there is more choice: Harvey’s Maps have produced maps which cover most of the area at 1:40 000 or 1:25 000. Wainwright’s Guides also include maps at 1:31 680. Thus the choice is much less obvious.

In this note I only cite the maps I have; they include examples of almost all types and series published in recent decades, and reflect my own choices for hillwalking.

First I make some general remarks about the main publishers, and then make more specific remarks, grouping them according to the scale of the map.

The Ordnance Survey

The Ordnance Survey’s modern maps are excellent for accuracy, rivalled only by Harvey’s; for detail they are unsurpassed.

Their problems stem from their comprehensiveness. There is much detail irrelevant to walkers, cluttering the map. Because they are almost all part of national series, covering the country, they naturally follow rectangular sheet edges; these leads to awkwardness when the edges do not match natural boundaries. Their delineation of footpaths is not what walkers need: on 1:25 000 maps, rights-of-way are given prominence over actual paths; on 1:50 000 maps, rights-of-way in red are lost against the orange-brown contour lines.

These are not drastic failings, but they are significant.

Wainwright’s Guides and the O.S.

In his first guide, published in 1955, Wainwright wrote [40, Introduction: Notes on the Illustrations]:

…the best literature of all for the walker is that published by the Ordnance Survey, the 1′′ map for companionship and guidance on expeditions, the 21
2′′ map for exploration both on the fells and by the fireside.

His guides document many inaccuracies in those maps (which of course were based on old O.S. surveys). Especially, as he says in the same place, the Ordnance Survey were inaccurate regarding paths, which his own maps he tried to show carefully. Of course, his books are out of date, but they are often still more useful regarding paths than the O.S. There is a general tendency for paths to be better defined than Wainwright describes them, no doubt because of the greater number of walkers; in a few cases pathless routes described by Wainwright now have beaten paths as people have followed his routes.

After the 1-in maps had started showing public rights-of-way, he wrote [42, Caw Fell 6]:

In earlier books in this series some peevish comment was made on the omission from Ordnance maps of well established footpaths in long use… In revised editions of the 1′′ map from 1962 onwards, however, footpaths galore appear for the first time; but, unfortunately, many of them are not visible on the ground: in other words, footpaths are now shown that do not exist, although a right of way is not disputed.

The Ordnance Survey still fail walkers in their delineation of paths.

The second edition of his guidebooks [4644454748], revised by Chris Jesty, brings them up to date again. In almost all the places I can recall from my own experience, the second edition shows paths correctly. They have one other improvement: paths are now shown in dark red, making them distinctive on the maps.

Harvey’s Maps

Harvey are a little-known company which specialize in maps for the walker and others like them (I believe they grew from providing maps for orienteers). They produce excellent maps at 1:40 000 and 1:25 000, with just the information needed by walkers. They are similar to the O.S. for accuracy. Paths are shown clearly, as walkers need them. They are usually printed on water-resistent material.

Harvey’s maps are expensive, rarely obtainable over the counter, and often become unavailable after a short period in print. They often tinker with them, re-issuing a map at a different scale, or with a slightly different area.

Despite these problems, Harvey’s maps are in my view the best for walking.

Bartholemew

Bartholemew used to be a major mapmaker, the Ordnance Survey’s only rival; they are now superseded, except that their maps are very attractive and still give the clearest overall picture of the hills, because of the strong layer colouring.

Maps of scale 12-in/mi, 1:126 720

There is only one map I know of which is likely to be found, out of print: the Bartholemew’s [2]. It is a good picture of the whole Lake District and nearby Pennines, useful perhaps for planning a tour, but far too inaccurate (as well as being outdated) for walking.

Older than that, the O.S. did once publish a 12-in/mi map series [26]. It was very slightly better than Barts for walking, being somewhat more accurate, but of course the scale is too small.

Maps of scale 1:110 000

The Ordnance Survey have replaced the 1-in map by a map also labelled ‘tourist’ but at this unusual 1:110 000 scale. It seems to be a blown-up version of their 1:250 000, aimed primarily at motorists. The press release has the disrecommendation ‘ideal for those who are not regular map users’. Similar to the Bartholemew’s 1
2-in as far as walkers are concerned. Naming it ‘tourist’ is confusing to those who knew the 1-in map, which is usable for walking. It does not even have the virtue of the old Bartholemew’s maps, that they were fit for framing.

Maps of scale 1:100 000

Bartholemew’s once published these, with one sheet covering almost all the Lake District, and another [1] needed for the Caldbeck and Uldale fells. They share the characteristics of the 1
2-in. I also have the same mapping in a ‘leisure atlas’ [49].

Maps of scale 1-in/mi, 1:63 360

The O.S. published for many years the 1-in Tourist map [32]. But it was out of date, and the layer colouring is very dark, making it hard to read, especially in poor light. Rights of way are in red against brown.

There was once a Bartholemew’s [3] (and is still, I think – by Collins). Like the 1
2-in it gives a good general picture. But it is far too inaccurate for walking except in perfect weather.

The regular 1-in maps of the same age split the district even more awkwardly than the 1:50 000, in that two non-overlapping maps [3031] were needed for the main part of the District, with the sheet boundary poorly placed for an ascent of Helvellyn. Two more [2933] were needed for full coverage in the south, including the Coniston fells. At least, however, they did not have a dark background. One advantage the Lancaster & Kendal sheet [33] had was coverage of the Whinfell Ridge and Bretherdale Common: all current O.S. or Harvey’s maps have inconvenient sheet boundaries, making a walk in the Westmoreland Borrowdale awkward. An earlier 1-in series, of 1925, was similar to the 1:50 000, with most of the Lake District on one sheet, Keswick and Ambleside [27], but a few western and southern fells [28] on different sheets.

Until it was discontinued the 1-in Tourist was the only way to buy a single map which covered the district. Now Harvey’s 1:40 000, which covers almost all the hills, is far preferable (though more expensive).

The loss of the 1-in Tourist is a shame. Though far from ideal for walking, it provided a cheap single sheet for the whole Lake District, useful as a back-up map (for example, for members of a party other than the leader to carry).

Maps of scale 1:50 000

The O.S. covers the Lake District in three of its standard 1:50 000 sheets, 89, 90 and 96; sheet 90 [39] covers most of the fells, but still omits many significant western and southern fells, for which sheets 89 [35] and 96 are needed; sheet 97 [36] covers the south-eastern foothills and a small part of the fells. Unlike in much of the country, they are not a good choice for the Lake District. The sheet boundaries go through the District, without any regard to the natural subdivisions of the area. The red right-of-way markings do not show up well against the dense1 brown contour lines, and they only show paths where not coincident with rights of way.

Maps of scale 1:40 000

Harvey’s have produced many maps at this scale. For most hillwalking these are in my view the best: the scale is about right. The maps are well designed and show what hillwalkers need to know. They lack detail for lowland walking, such as field boundaries in cultivated land.

Unfortunately Harveys keep changing what they have in print. To start with they produced several small sheets: Scafell & the Langdale Fells [4] (later renamed to Western Lakeland [10]), Borrowdale [5], Northern Lakeland [9], Helvellyn [6], Eastern Lakeland [7], Southern Lakeland [11]. The name and exact coverage of the sheets changed confusingly: for example, Borrowdale became North West Lakeland [8].

They produced a spiral-bound atlas [14] using the same basic mapping. Harvey’s Lakes Atlas is wire-bound, a little smaller than A5 (14 × 24 cm) in size, 96 pages. To me this is an inconvenient format, and somewhat heavy. Nevertheless this has the fullest coverage of all Harvey’s Lake District maps, even more than the 1:25 000 ‘Superwalker’ maps. The atlas extends, for example, SW as far as Black Combe. The area covered is irregular, but includes the whole of the National Park. Except that I find it hard to treat a map or book thus, it might be most useful if unbound by cutting the binding, and taking single sheets on walks. This atlas uses layer colouring; this is somewhat lighter in shade than the O.S. 1-in, which makes it easier to read, though still not as easy as their original smaller sheets, which used white for hill country.

A little later they produced a single large sheet [18] covering almost all the higher part of the District, though not the outlying parts. Like the Atlas, it uses layer colouring. A full review of this map appears in the appendix . A second edition [22] soon appeared.

They also produce two maps for long distance paths through the Lake District: the Cumbria Way [16], and the Coast-to-Coast [21]. They do not use layer colouring. Although mainly of use to somebody walking the particular route, some of the strips are sufficiently wide that they could be used for other walks. For example, the Cumbria Way map shows most of the Northern Fells, from Ullock Pike to Blencathra, Keswick to Caldbeck; only the western and eastern edges are omitted.

Maps of scale 2-in/mi, 1:31 680

Most of Wainwright’s maps are of this scale. It is still true that Wainwright’s maps, dated as they are, are more useful than the Ordnance Survey when it comes to paths. He shows a wider variety of types of path, by using dots and dashes in varying proportions. He also distinguishes between fences and walls of different types and states; only Harvey’s maps do this, and not to the same extent. Of course, all his maps, being hand-drawn with coarser lines than a machine can produce, with contour lines at 100 ft intervals only, cannot match today’s O.S. or Harvey’s maps in topographical accuracy.

Wainwright’s maps in the guidebooks are presented in small pieces, one (or more than one) for each fell. They have been edited and re-presented as whole maps, one for each of the books [43].

The second edition of the guides (in mid 2008, only the first five volumes are available [4445464748]) restores their accuracy. In almost all the places where I have first-hand knowledge, the paths and other features are marked correctly.

Maps of scale 1:25 000

Here there is direct competition between Harvey’s and the O.S. Though they are of the same scale, the maps are rather different. The Harvey’s look like blown-up versions of their 1:40 000 maps: as if they were large-print editions.2 The Ordnance Survey, on the other hand, have much more detail, and the resolution is finer. The O.S. have contour lines at 10 m intervals where Harvey’s use 15 m. The O.S. show all field boundaries, Harvey’s only show them in open land. On the other hand the O.S. use sheet boundaries which are rectangular, whereas Harvey’s follow natural boundaries, which means that one is more likely to have to change over maps during a walk with the O.S. Harvey’s are better on land which has many small crags (like Rosthwaite Fell): they show this by changing the contour colour to grey, whereas the O.S. pepper the map with crag symbols, making the contours unreadable.

The O.S. have had three significant changes over recent decades. The first Outdoor Leisure series [34] (I cite the N.W. sheet as an example) was based on old mapping, with inaccurate contour lines. Then they republished with new mapping [37], with slightly different sheet lines. More recently they have made the sheet double-sided [38], adding the areas on the north and south fringes of the Lake District; this is most useful for hillwalkers in the north, where the Caldbeck and Uldale fells are thus added. The latest printings show access land under the CRoW Act; this is not of great interest in the Lake District, where there has been de facto access land for a long time.3

The older Harvey’s maps (again, using the sheet for the (north-)western area as an example [12]) did have a few special features – for example, an enlarged map of Scafell summit on the reverse. They named fells in Wainwright’s guides distinctively. But they have little detail beyond the 1:40 000. They also folded awkwardly.

The most recent edition (2005 or so) of these maps continues Harvey’s practice of producing good maps with irritating niggles. If we compare the Western Lakeland sheet [20] with the older one [12], we find some improvements but other things worse.4 The folding has now changed to the usual OS-style fanfold, which is easier to use in a map case. But the coverage is less, partly because the map is now single-sided; some good, though less popular, hill-walking areas are now omitted.5 They have replaced the single Southern Lakeland sheet with two, one for the south-west [24] and one for the south-east [23]; this is good mainly because the south-western sheet covers the ridge out to Black Combe.6 Oddly, the south-eastern sheet omits most of Whitbarrow, one of the few good fells in the area. Unlike the western edge of the set of sheets, which omits some worthwhile hills, the eastern edge [13] includes all the lesser Pennine-like hills all the way east to the A6.

Thus, whereas the Harvey’s 1:40 000 maps are superior to the O.S.’s 1:50 000, the situation is much more even with the 1:25 000, with the O.S. clearly covering a greater area for the same money. Oddly, it is the 1:25 000 Harvey’s maps which seem to stay in print, unlike their 1:40 000 maps.

Maps of scale larger than 1:25 000

There are of course the Ordnance Survey 1:10 000 maps, but I have never used these.

Harvey’s have one 1:12 500 map of Helvellyn, covering Dollywaggon Pike to White Side [17]. I can only imagine its being useful for a very eccentric walk.

Some other Harvey’s maps have large-scale supplementary maps. For example, their 1:40 000 [18] has on the reverse a 1:20 000 of the area from Scafell Pike to Langdale, and another of Pillar. Their older 1:25 000 of Western Lakeland [12] had on the reverse a 1:12 500 of the summit of Scafell and Scafell Pike.

Wainwright uses 6′′mi (1:10 560) for the summit of the Scafells [41, Scafell Pike 30], and other large scales for a few other places.

Price and weight comparison


size/km2price/p/km2
OS 1:50k (40 km × 40 km) 1600 7 0.44
OS 1:25k Lakes NE 1260 8 0.63
Harvey’s Lakes Atlas 2290 15 0.66
Harvey’s Dales N. 1:40k 840 7 0.83
OS 1:50k (40 km × 40 km) laminated 1600 14 0.87
Harvey’s BMC Lakes 2nd ed. 1400 13 0.93
OS 1:25k Lakes NE laminated 1260 14 1.11
OS 1:25k normal (20 km × 30 km) 600 8 1.33
OS 1:25k 303 (Lakes W. coast) 480 8 1.66
Harvey’s Cheviots 1:40k 530 10 1.88
Harvey’s Lakeland W old 1:25k 430 10 2.31
Harvey’s Lakeland E 1:25k 331 10 3.02
Harvey’s Lakeland SE 1:25k 329 10 3.04
Harvey’s Lakeland W 1:25k 328 10 3.05
Harvey’s Lakeland N 1:25k 328 10 3.05
Harvey’s Lakeland SW 1:25k 319 10 3.13
Harvey’s Lakeland C 1:25k 318 10 3.14

Table 1: 2008 prices of serious walking maps compared; ordered by price per area covered


total
sheetsweight/gprice/
Harvey’s BMC Lakes 2nd ed. 1 90 13Many fringes omitted
Harvey’s Lakes Atlas (book) 270 15National Park covered
OS 1:50k 3 300 214 sheets for SE fringe
OS 1:25k Lakes 4 500 32Widest coverage
OS 1:50k laminated 3 (?) 570 424 sheets for SE fringe
Harvey’s Lakeland 1:25k 6 600 50
OS 1:25k Lakes laminated 4 800 56Widest coverage

Table 2: Maps covering the whole of the Lake District compared; ordered by total price

Table 1 compares some prices taken in June 2008. Since all the prices were of the irritating .99 or .95 type, I have rounded all to the nearest pound. Areas are approximate, especially for Harvey maps which have non-rectangular mapped areas. A 1:40k Harvey map outside the Lake District has been included, as a general indication of the 1:40k small sheets of the Lake District which used to be available. Table 2 shows the cost and weight for a map or maps which cover the whole of the Lake District; note that the area covered is not the same for each set of maps, but each set covers the well-known core of the Lake District, at least.7

Appendix: The new Harvey’s 1:40 000

The 1:40 000 from Harvey’s Maps [18], published in 2005, is an excellent map, worth its high price.

Harvey’s have had 1:40 000 maps of the Lake District for some time. Originally they published them as separate sheets for each area; recently they have only been available as an atlas of the whole district, or enlarged to 1:25 000. Now they have reworked their mapping and republished it through the BMC as a single sheet. This is very useful, since it is the only good map of the Lake District on one sheet. (The O.S. 1-in is only usable for planning and for walking in clear weather; in any case it no longer seems to be available.) For almost all fellwalking 1:40 000 is adequate; it allows for more detail than 1:50 000, such as field boundaries on the fells, while avoiding the bulk of 1:25 000 (and the inconvenience of repeated refolding). In many years’ walking in the Lake District I have rarely wanted to use 1:25 000 maps; I prefer the Harvey’s 1:40 000.

The map covers the area from Great Borne in the west, to Burnbanks in the east; Torver in the south to Sale Fell in the north. Overleaf there is a small extra section to extend the northern fells as far as Great Calva(only). The area covered is rectangular except for a small amount omitted north of the A66 and east of Souther Fell. On the obverse there are 1:20 000 enlargements of the Scafell Pike and Langdale area, and another of Pillar. The most important criticism I have of the map is that it does not include all the hills at the northern and western edges: the Caldbeck and Uldale fells are missing (Knott, High Pike, Carrock Fell); in the west Blake Fell and Grike are missing. Harvey’s have mapped these areas, since they have published them on other sheets (1:25 000 Lakeland West, 1:40 000 Northern Lakeland). It is a shame that some of the verbiage on the obverse could not have been replaced by extensions for these areas.

Like all Harvey’s walking maps it shows what hillwalkers need, and not all sorts of irrelevant detail. Paths are accurately shown in all the areas I recall; actual paths are more prominent than the symbols for rights-of-way. Compared to some other Harvey’s maps there is more ‘tourist information’ (location of toilets, car parks and so on). Hills in Wainwright’s guidebooks are distinctively named (apart from Buckbarrow). Some climbers’ crags are named in red. Layer colouring is used – not as dark as the O.S. 1-in, though it still makes the map darker – I have not tried to use it in poor light. Given that the map also uses different shades of green for enclosed farmland and for woodland, it is (surprisingly) easy to read the colours.

An odd feature of the map is that it hides its excellence. The main map is on the reverse. The obverse is filled up with advertisements for the BMC, elementary advice on navigating, and the like (mostly in a large sans-serif font, taking up too much space). There is a geological map which I found almost unreadable.

The map is printed on a plastic which is claimed waterproof. I treat such claims with suspicion, and would not venture to rely on it more than perhaps refolding the map in the rain before returning it to a map case. But perhaps it will prove more waterproof than Harvey’s early ‘Duxbak’ material (which was better than paper, but still did not withstand rain). At least it does not have the bulk and weight of laminated maps.

A year later they issued a second edition [22]. This makes some improvements, but other things worse. The main map is on the obverse – better; but to make room for the cover and title, they cut away the vale of Lorton, Low Fell and Mellbreak. This is only partly made up by an extension on the reverse, of lower Ennerdale. The map of Scafell Pike and the Langdales has been cut down to just Great End to Scafell, but enlarged to 1:15 000. Similarly for the map of Pillar. The geological map is much easier to read, though still not wonderful. In summary, like the first edition it is a very good map: it is just a shame they did not deal with all the minor deficiencies.

Notes on the bibliography

In this list of maps I have tried to give considerable detail on the edges of the maps. The places mentioned are ones near the edge of the map, but just within it. When a hill name is given, it refers to the summit; often some of its lower slopes in one direction may be off the map. (It is a nuisance that despite catalogues on the Web, it is often difficult to find out this information without seeing the map; this list tries to provide it.)

References

[1]   Bartholemew. Carlisle and the Solway. Sheet 38 in National Map Series. John Bartholemew and Son Ltd, 1977. ISBN 0 7028 0038 4. Scale 1:100 000.

Rectangular: near the edges of the map: S Great Calva, E Garrigill, N Thornhill, W Castle Douglas

[2]   Bartholemew. English Lakes. Sheet 34 in Revised “Half-Inch” Contoured Maps: Great Britain. John Bartholemew and Son Ltd, n.d. Scale 1:126 720. The only obvious indication of date is that it has the royal arms ‘by appointment to the late King George V’.

Rectangular: N: High Pike; W: St Bees Head; S: Dalton, Ingleton; E: Bowes Moor Old Spital.

[3]   Bartholemew. One-Inch Map of the Lake District. John Bartholemew and Son Ltd, n.d. Scale 1:63 360. The only obvious indication of date is that it has the royal arms ‘by appointment to the late King George V’.

Rectangular, N: Cockermouth and Penrith; W: Flat Fell; S: Newby Bridge; E: High Borrow Bridge. Paper on cloth.

[4]   Harvey Maps. Scafell & the Langdale Fells. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1981. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N: 165 grid line, W: Great Borne, Iron Crag, Strands, Green; S: just S of Hardknott and Wrynose Passes to Skelwith Bridge; E: Grasmere and Dunmail Raise. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[5]   Harvey Maps. Borrowdale & the Derwent Fells. Harvey Mountain Map. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1985. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: on N, the Whinlatter Pass and A66; on E, B road to Thirlmere and A591 east of Thirlmere; on S grid line 15 between Thirlmere and Rosthwaite, road from Seatoller to Buttermere; on W, road from Buttermere to High Lorton. Printed on Duxbak, claimed to be waterproof; experience has proved that it does wear more easily when wet, though much less than paper. Fanfolded W–E, one final fold N–S.

[6]   Harvey Maps. Helvellyn and High Street. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1985. ISBN 1 85137 180 X. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N Threlkeld Quarries, Old Coach Road, Dockray, Pooley Bridge; W road over Dunmail Raise to Ambleside, but including Loughrigg Fell; S 02 grid line; E Sadgill, Branstree, Pooley Bridge. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Includes a Visitor Guide leaflet. Claimed waterproof – ‘Duxbak’ – but my copy shows signs of water damage.

[7]   Harvey Maps. Eastern Lakeland. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1992. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N Threlkeld Quarries, Old Coach Road, Dockray, Pooley Bridge; W road over Dunmail Raise to Ambleside, but including Loughrigg Fell; S 02 grid line; E Sadgill, Branstree, Pooley Bridge. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Includes a Visitor Guide leaflet. Claimed waterproof.

[8]   Harvey Maps. North West Lakeland. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1992. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N: Pheasant Inn, A66 to Cockermouth; W road Cockermouth to Lamplugh and Croasdale; S Ennerdale Water and 14 grid line, extended for Honister Pass; E Thirlmere; NE roads Thirlmere to Keswick and Mire House. Fanfolded N–S; one final fold E–W. Includes a Visitor Guide leaflet. Claimed waterproof.

[9]   Harvey Maps. Northern Lakeland. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1992. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N: Caldbeck, High Ireby; W: Bewaldeth, Pheasant Inn, Robinson; S: 161 grid line: W: main road E of Thirlmere, Threlkeld, A66, Mosedale, Hesket Newmarket. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Claimed waterproof.

[10]   Harvey Maps. Western Lakeland. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1992. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N: 17 grid line, but Floutern Pass, W: Bowness Knott, Iron Crag, Nether Wasdale, Eskdale Green; S: Hardknott and Wrynose Passes to Sklewith Bridge; E: Grasmere and Dunmail Raise. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W. Claimed waterproof.

[11]   Harvey Maps. Southern Lakeland. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1995. ISBN 1-85137-197-4. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: N: Boot, Hardknott and Wrynose Passes to Ambleside; W: 175 grid line; S: Broughton in Furness to Lakeside; E: main road just E of Windermere. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W. Claimed waterproof.

[12]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland West. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 1999. ISBN 1-85137-327-6. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: main sheet NY 112 007 to NY 279 242, with some irregularities at edges. On reverse: Langdale NY 251 041 to NY 297 082, Ennerdale Water NY 081 092 to NY 126 251, Scafell Summit 1:12 500 NY 048 201 to NY 223 099. Claimed waterproof – shiny surface. Fanfolded W–E, two final folds N–S.

[13]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland East. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2003. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: Pooley Bridge, Askham, Wet Sleddale, Hucks Bridge, Sour Howes, Wansfell Pike, Gowbarrow Fell. Single sided. Fanfolded S–N, one final fold E–W. Claimed waterproof.

[14]   Harvey Maps. Lake District Outdoor Atlas. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2004. ISBN 1851374906. Scale 1:40000.

As well as the main maps, at 1:40000, there are pages giving tourist information, enlargements of Helvellyn summit (White Side to Dollywaggon) and Scafell summit (Sty Head and Great End to Slight Side) at 1:25000. The boundary of the main maps is irregular, roughly following the National Park boundary, extended outward to include close main roads and towns/villages (Cockermouth, Kendal); also Dent Fell in the W. There are insert maps at 1:30000 of towns and large villages, but these add little since streets are not named. The main maps have good overlap between pages, except that facing pages have no overlap.

[15]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland North. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2004. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: Hesket Newmarket, Clough Head, Low Fell, Blindcrake. Single sided. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Claimed waterproof.

[16]   Harvey Maps. Cumbria Way. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2005. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: In 5 sections.

  1. Rectangular: Three Bridges SW of Ulverston, Lowick Green, Beacon Tarn, Burney summit.
  2. Rectangular: High Nibthwaite, Loughrigg Fell summit, Thunacar Knott summit, Goats Hause.
  3. Rectangular, plus Langdale bottom extension: Bowfell’s Band, Ullscarf, Keswick, Seatoller; also Blea Rigg to Silver Howe.
  4. Roughly rectangular: Keswick, Blencathra, Caldbeck, Ullock Pike.
  5. Irregular: Hesket Newmarket, Stockdalewath, Carlisle, Dalston, Welton, Caldbeck.

Also includes simplified town plans at 1:12 500 of Carlisle, Keswick, Ulverston, mainly to show the path. Fanfolded N-S, one final fold E-W. Claimed waterproof.

[17]   Harvey Maps. Helvellyn Summit. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2005. Scale 1:12 500.

Extent: N: grid line 169, White Side and Keppel Cove pony track; W: grid line 329, Browncove Crags; S: grid line 129, Dollywagon Pike; E: grid line 362, Hole in the Wall. National Grid shown at 100 m. Laminated in plastic; A3 flat.

[18]   Harvey Maps. Lake District. British Mountain Maps. British Mountaineering Club, 2005. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: W: Great Borne; E: Burnbanks; S: Torver; N: Sale Fell. Overleaf there is a small extra section to extend the northern fells as far as Great Calva (only). The area covered is rectangular except for a small amount omitted north of the A66 and east of Souther Fell. On the obverse there are 1:20 000 enlargements of the Scafell Pike and Langdale area, and another of Pillar. Plastic; claimed waterproof. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W. The main map is on the reverse.

[19]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland Central. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2005. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: N Keswick to Dockray, S Wansfell Pike to Three Shire Stone. Single sided. Fanfolded S–N, one final fold E–W. Claimed waterproof.

[20]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland West. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2005. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: Keswick, Three Shire Stone, Boot, Whin Rigg, Seatallan, Great Borne, Mellbreak, Hopebeck, Whinlatter Pass. Single sided. Fanfolded S–N, one final fold E–W. Claimed waterproof.

[21]   Harvey Maps. Coast to Coast West: St Bees to Keld. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2006. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: In 6 sections.

  1. Roughly rectangular: St Bees, Lank Rigg, BownessKnott, Ennerdale Bridge, St Bees Head.
  2. Rectangular: Brandreth, Great Crag, Red Pike, Grike.
  3. Rectangular: Grasmere, Satura Crag, Patterdale, Watendlath Tarn, Seatoller.
  4. Roughly rectangular: Froswick, Wasdale Pike, Shap, Beda Fell, Patterdale, Middle Dodd.
  5. Irregular: Raisbeck, Smardale Bridge, Smardale, Little Asby, Beacon Hill, Crosby Ravensworth, Shap, Orton.
  6. Roughly rectangular: Little Fell, Keld, moor 2 km E of Tan Hill, Kirby Stephen, Smardale.

Fanfolded E-W, one final fold N-S. Claimed waterproof.

[22]   Harvey Maps. Lake District. British Mountain Maps. British Mountaineering Club, 2006. Scale 1:40 000.

Extent: W: Whiteside, Rannerdale Knotts, Pillar, Caw Fell; E: Burnbanks; S: Torver; N: Sale Fell. Overleaf there is a small extra section to extend the northern fells as far as Great Calva (only), and Ennerdale westwards to Gavel Fell, Mellbreak south top and Lank Rigg. The area covered is rectangular except for a small amount omitted north of the A66 and east of Souther Fell, and a rectangular piece in the NW. On the reverse there are 1:15 000 enlargements of Scafell Pike, and another of Pillar. Plastic; claimed waterproof. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[23]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland South East. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2006. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: Sleddale Forest, Kendal, Brigsteer, Backbarrow, Spark Bridge, Holme Fell, Black Fell. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Single sided. Claimed waterproof.

[24]   Harvey Maps. Lakeland South West. Superwalker. Harvey Map Services Ltd, 2006. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: Roughly rectangular: Wetherlam, Tarn Hows, High Nibthwaite, Broughton in Furness, Whicham, Ravenglass, Eskdale. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S. Single sided. Claimed waterproof.

[25]   International ISBN Agency. ISBN users’ manual – frequently asked questions about the isbn system. http://www.isbn-international.org/en/userman/faq.html, SeenNovember 2007.

[26]   Ordnance Survey. Road Map of Carlisle. Sheet 2. 1913. Scale 1:126 720.

Hill-shaded. Contours at irregular intervals. Described as reduced from the one-inch map of 1901–03. (The sheet to the south, number 5, shows the bulk of the Lake District.)

Extent: Rectangular: S: Skiddaw summit, just; E: Kirkhaugh near Alston; N: Kielder railway station; W: 3 miles or so W of Maxwelltown near Dumfries.

[27]   Ordnance Survey. Keswick & Ambleside. Sheet 12 in Popular Edition. 1925. Scale 1:63 360. The date is given as ‘First published 1925, with periodical corrected reprints’.

Extent: N: Mungrisdale Common summit; W: Burnbank Fell summit; S: Dalegarth Station; E: Rosgill near Shap.

[28]   Ordnance Survey. Windermere & Ulverston. Sheet 19 in Popular Edition. 1925. Scale 1:63 360. The date is given as ‘First published 1925, with periodical corrected reprints’.

Extent: N: Troutbeck Bridge; W: Hooker Crag on Muncaster Fell; S: Hawcoat near Dalton in Furness; E: Oxenholme. Most oddly, this map has black and blue colour only, without contour lines – I do not know whether this is because of fading, or because it was imperfect originally.

[29]   Ordnance Survey. Barrow in Furness. Sheet 88 in One-inch Map of England & Wales. New popular edition, 1947. Scale 1:63 360. 1920 is given as the date of full revision.

Extent: Rectangular: SW corner 0060, NE 4005

[30]   Ordnance Survey. Keswick. Sheet 82 in One-inch Map of England & Wales. New popular edition, 1947. Scale 1:63 360. 1921 is given as the date of full revision.

Extent: Rectangular: SW corner 9305, NE 3350

[31]   Ordnance Survey. Penrith. Sheet 83 in One-inch Map of England & Wales. New popular edition, 1947. Scale 1:63 360. 1920 is given as the date of full revision.

Extent: Rectangular: SW corner 3305, NE 7350

[32]   Ordnance Survey. Lake District: Tourist Map. 1966. Scale 1:63 360.

Extent: N: Caldbeck, 40 grid line; W: Lamplugh, 08 grid line, S: Greenodd, 82 grid line; E: Shap, 57 grid line. Fanfolded E–W, one final fold N–S.

[33]   Ordnance Survey. Lancaster & Kendal. Sheet 89. 1971. Scale 1:63 360. The copyright year is given as 1965, but major roads as revised in 1971.

Extent: Rectangular: SW corner 3060, NE 7005.

[34]   Ordnance Survey. The English Lakes: North West Sheet: Ennerdale and Derwent. 1974. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: N: 30 grid line; W: 07 grid line; S: 09 grid line; E: 33 grid line. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[35]   Ordnance Survey. Workington and Whitehaven. Sheet 89 in Landranger First Series. 1976. Scale 1:50 000.

Extent: NX 900 000 to NY 300 400. Sheets 89 and 90 adjoin to the N. Sheet 90 has 570 as eastern edge (and so overlaps with this), same N,S edges. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[36]   Ordnance Survey. Kendal & Morecombe. Sheet 97 in Landranger First Series. 1980. Scale 1:50 000.

Extent: SD 260 600 to NY 660 000. Sheet 96 overlaps this sheet 97, with eastern edge 430, same N,S edges. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[37]   Ordnance Survey. The English Lakes: North Western area: showing Ennerdale and Derwent. Sheet 4 in Outdoor Leisure. 1989. Scale 1:25 000.

Extent: N: 30 grid line; W: 03 grid line; S: 09 grid line; E: 33 grid line. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[38]   Ordnance Survey. The English Lakes: North-western area: Keswick, Cockermouth & Wigton. Sheet OL4 in Explorer Map. 2005. Scale 1:25 000.

Double-sided. Extent of obverse: N: 31 grid line; W: 01 grid line; S: 09 grid line; E: 31 grid line. On reverse, area to N; N: 05 grid line; W: 01 grid line; S: 30 grid line; E: 31 grid line (so 1 km overlap). Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[39]   Ordnance Survey. Penrith & Keswick. Sheet 90 in Landranger Second Series. C2 edition, 2006. Scale 1:50 000.

Extent: NY 170 000 to NY 570 400. Sheet 89 overlaps this sheet 90, same N,S edges. Fanfolded N–S, one final fold E–W.

[40]   A. Wainwright. The Eastern Fells. volume one of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Westmorland Gazette, 1955.

[41]   A. Wainwright. The Southern Fells. volume four of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Westmorland Gazette, 1960.

[42]   A. Wainwright. The Western Fells. volume seven of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Westmorland Gazette, 1966.

[43]   A. Wainwright. Eastern Fells. Map 1 in Wainwright Maps of the Lakeland Fells. Chop McKean Mapping, 1997. ISBN 0952653028.

This, and the remainder of the series corresponding to the guidebooks, consists of the maps from the guidebooks pieced together to form a single map for each area.

[44]   A. Wainwright and Chris Jesty. The Eastern Fells. volume one of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Frances Lincoln, second edition, 2005. Chris Jesty is the reviser.

[45]   A. Wainwright and Chris Jesty. The Far Eastern Fells. volume two of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Frances Lincoln, 2005. Chris Jesty is the reviser.

[46]   A. Wainwright and Chris Jesty. The Central Fells. volume three of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Frances Lincoln, 2006. Chris Jesty is the reviser.

[47]   A. Wainwright and Chris Jesty. The Southern Fells. volume four of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Frances Lincoln, 2007. Chris Jesty is the reviser.

[48]   A. Wainwright and Chris Jesty. The Northern Fells. volume five of a Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells: being an illustrated account of a study and exploration of the mountains in the English Lake District. Frances Lincoln, 2008. Chris Jesty is the reviser.

[49]   Colin Watson. Hamlyn Leisure Atlas: North Country. Hamlyn Publishing Group Ltd, 1982. Scale 1:100 000. This includes Bartholemew’s maps covering the area between the Scottish border in the north to the Lancaster in the south, plus a small section further south covering Harrogate and York.